Sketchplanations

Explaining one thing a day in a sketch.

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Fartlek.
Somewhat improbable name for a simple training technique alternating fast and slower sections. Great if you’re short on time.

Fartlek.

Somewhat improbable name for a simple training technique alternating fast and slower sections. Great if you’re short on time.

Treat your ideas with respect.
Scribbling on a post-it doesn’t give your ideas they respect they deserve. Change the way you and others consider them by using a simple format that makes people think twice before dismissing and does more to get your idea across.
HT: Jump Associates

Treat your ideas with respect.

Scribbling on a post-it doesn’t give your ideas they respect they deserve. Change the way you and others consider them by using a simple format that makes people think twice before dismissing and does more to get your idea across.

HT: Jump Associates

In tandem.
Means one in front of another, as opposed to side-by-side. It comes from a tandem harness with two horses pulling with one in front of the other. So technically no matter how many people you put on a bike, if they are in a straight line, they are still in tandem. As opposed to a bike where you sit side-by-side, also known as a sociable.
I had to check this one out as on Friday I’m doing a somewhat crazy cycle on a home-made 6-man bike (all sitting in tandem) from London to Amsterdam for a great cause - KEEN London who provide one-to-one sports for children with special needs. Any donation you can make will make a huge difference to a small organisation. With just one day left, please donate here if you can

In tandem.

Means one in front of another, as opposed to side-by-side. It comes from a tandem harness with two horses pulling with one in front of the other. So technically no matter how many people you put on a bike, if they are in a straight line, they are still in tandem. As opposed to a bike where you sit side-by-side, also known as a sociable.

I had to check this one out as on Friday I’m doing a somewhat crazy cycle on a home-made 6-man bike (all sitting in tandem) from London to Amsterdam for a great cause - KEEN London who provide one-to-one sports for children with special needs. Any donation you can make will make a huge difference to a small organisation. With just one day left, please donate here if you can

Figure and ground.
How we choose to separate objects from the background. Also see FedEx. Travel is good for resetting our figures and grounds.

Figure and ground.

How we choose to separate objects from the background. Also see FedEx. Travel is good for resetting our figures and grounds.

Mental accounting.
Dividing up money in your head. Nutmeg, where I work, is, among other things, designed to help out with this.
PSIt’s been a long absence. A new child, moving house and all sorts of fun has happened. I’ll try to keep at it at a more leisurely pace. Thanks again for following.

Mental accounting.

Dividing up money in your head. Nutmeg, where I work, is, among other things, designed to help out with this.

PS
It’s been a long absence. A new child, moving house and all sorts of fun has happened. I’ll try to keep at it at a more leisurely pace. Thanks again for following.

Desire path.
Created by desire and use. Sometimes I find myself walking on the traces of one as a statement that ‘there ought to be a path here’ - voting with my feet.
There’s the classic, perhaps apocryphal, story of the architect who didn’t build any paths on a campus until people had worn them in, showing where the paths should be.
The phenomena has found use in technology with the phrase ‘pave the cowpaths’.
More detail from Dan Lockton:

One emergent behaviour-related concept arising from architecture and planning which has also found application in human-computer interaction is the idea of desire lines, desire paths or cowpaths. The usual current use of the term (often attributed, although apparently in error, to Bachelard’s The Poetics of Space (1964)) is to describe paths worn by pedestrians across spaces such as parks, between buildings or to avoid obstacles—“the foot-worn paths that sometimes appear in a landscape over time” (Mathes, 2004) and which become self-reinforcing as subsequent generations of pedestrians follow what becomes an obvious path. Throgmorton & Eckstein (2000) also discuss Chicago transportation engineers’ use of ‘desire lines’ to describe maps of straight-line origin-to-destination journeys across the city, in the process revealing assumptions about the public’s ‘desire’ to undertake these journeys. In either sense, desire lines (along with use-marks (Burns, 2007)) could perhaps, using economic terminology, be seen as a form of revealed user preference (Beshears et al, 2008) or at least revealed choice, with a substantial normative quality.
Architecture, urbanism, design and behaviour: a brief review, Dan Lockton, Sep 2011

Or see this very concrete example from UC Berkeley at peterme.com.

Desire path.

Created by desire and use. Sometimes I find myself walking on the traces of one as a statement that ‘there ought to be a path here’ - voting with my feet.

There’s the classic, perhaps apocryphal, story of the architect who didn’t build any paths on a campus until people had worn them in, showing where the paths should be.

The phenomena has found use in technology with the phrase ‘pave the cowpaths’.

More detail from Dan Lockton:

One emergent behaviour-related concept arising from architecture and planning which has also found application in human-computer interaction is the idea of desire lines, desire paths or cowpaths. The usual current use of the term (often attributed, although apparently in error, to Bachelard’s The Poetics of Space (1964)) is to describe paths worn by pedestrians across spaces such as parks, between buildings or to avoid obstacles—“the foot-worn paths that sometimes appear in a landscape over time” (Mathes, 2004) and which become self-reinforcing as subsequent generations of pedestrians follow what becomes an obvious path. Throgmorton & Eckstein (2000) also discuss Chicago transportation engineers’ use of ‘desire lines’ to describe maps of straight-line origin-to-destination journeys across the city, in the process revealing assumptions about the public’s ‘desire’ to undertake these journeys. In either sense, desire lines (along with use-marks (Burns, 2007)) could perhaps, using economic terminology, be seen as a form of revealed user preference (Beshears et al, 2008) or at least revealed choice, with a substantial normative quality.

Architecture, urbanism, design and behaviour: a brief review, Dan Lockton, Sep 2011

Or see this very concrete example from UC Berkeley at peterme.com.

Identify a Douglas fir.
Once this had come to mind I haven’t forgotten since.

Identify a Douglas fir.

Once this had come to mind I haven’t forgotten since.

If you live ‘til you’re 90 you will have slept for 32 years.

If you live ‘til you’re 90 you will have slept for 32 years.

Easily draw expressions.
Not my invention. Most recently spotted via the excellent Eva-lotta Lamm.

Easily draw expressions.

Not my invention. Most recently spotted via the excellent Eva-lotta Lamm.

Watch out for barnacles.
More value will likely be found through analogy than the shipping situation. Watch out for barnacles on your project.
HT Lee Cowles.

Watch out for barnacles.

More value will likely be found through analogy than the shipping situation. Watch out for barnacles on your project.

HT Lee Cowles.